Bike Month Activities for the Whole Family! 

National Bike Month is here and we want to celebrate!  A lot of what we post relates to rules of the road, laws and ordinances, and safety, but today we’re going to talk about all the fun ways to celebrate National Bike Month with bike activities that can be enjoyed by the whole family. 

Plan a Ride with a Local Group

Ever city has cyclist riding groups, sometimes you just have to look for them.  And most of them offer rides for varying degrees of skill.  Some groups post their rides on the website and app Meetup (https://www.meetup.com) where you can find others to ride with for free.  In San Francisco, there is the San Francisco Cycling Club (http://www.sfcyclingclub.org) and the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition (https://sfbike.org) that frequently post scheduled rides.  You can also talk to the Coalition as they may know other groups with organized rides.  In Paso Robles, there is a list of groups that ride at Cycle Central Coast (https://www.cyclecentralcoast.com/resources) including a group that goes out every Sunday from Templeton and they frequently have beginner rides.  You can also talk to Bike SLO County (https://bikeslocounty.org) to find other organized rides and events. 

Tune Up Your Bike

A lot of riders are “fair weather riders” and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.  If you put your bike away for the winter, and even if you don’t, the spring is a great time to get a tune up on your bike.  You can tune it up yourself if you’ve got experience, or take it into a local bike shop for some help.  In San Francisco and San Luis Obispo, there is the Bike Kitchen (http://bikekitchen.org and https://bikeslocounty.org/programs/kitchen) available on select nights where you can bring your bike in and tune it up alongside other cyclists.  This can be a great bike activity to make new friends and riding buddies. 

Introduce Your Kids to Riding with Others

Many kids have a bike and ride around on their own street but don’t go much further.  This month is a great time to introduce your kids to an organized ride.  Talk to other parents and plan to have adults front, middle, and back of a few kids riding together in a quiet area.  There are bike trails to keep them away from traffic completely, or you can make this a time to learn the rules of the road by finding a route with minimal traffic and wide bike lanes to give them room.  Remember to ride single-file and obey traffic ordinances like red lights and stop signs.  Both the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition and Bike SLO County organize riding events for kids, so be sure to check their calendars and see if there is an event you’d like to bring your kids to: https://sfbike.org and https://bikeslocounty.org.

Set Up an Obstacle Course

This bike activity can be fun for the whole family or you can arrange it for adults with a few modifications to the difficulty levels.  Break out some sidewalk chalk on a street or set up cones (sometimes you can find small cones at the $5 and under stores or at sporting-goods stores).  You can make it exciting with a few water balloons on the ground you have to ride over to pop or use a pool noodle to create a limbo pole.  You can set up tight curves or even really thin lines to make a sort of on-the-ground balance beam to help work on precision riding. 

Ride to Geocache Locations

Have you ever gone Geocaching?  It can be a lot of fun and even a little bit addictive.  There are even Geocaches in hard-to-reach places like bike trails that normal Geocachers can’t get to, which makes this an excellent activity for cyclists.  What is it, you ask?  It’s a game where you use GPS coordinates (and your phone) to guide you to hidden compartments that contain a log book for you to sign and sometimes an object for you to trade with.  Always bring a pen with you to sign the log book as some compartments are too tiny to hold a pen.  For objects to trade, think small: a friendship bracelet, charm, keychain, or small plastic toy can all be Geocache treasures to trade for what you find in the compartment, if it has something for you to trade with.  Learn more here: https://www.geocaching.com/play.

Ride to Rewards

If Geocaching isn’t your idea of a treasure hunt, think of something worth riding for, like ice cream or a fancy doughnut.  Call up some friends or grab your family and ride to a local boutique with your favorite treat.  Afterall, it’s National Bike Month and that’s something worth celebrating with ice cream! 

Make it a Game

If you’ve got a group of kids, there are lots of great bike activity games out there you can play.  You can play music and all riders must freeze when it stops, or cycle in a line and play copy-cat with the leader of the line.  There are 20 games outlined in this PDF we found: https://www.cyklistforbundet.dk/media/mksfflaz/cykellege_bog_engelsk_4.pdf

Whatever you do, have fun!  We like to think ever month is bike month, but really, May is our National Bike Month and it’s time to get your bike prepped and go out there are ride! 

Training Wheels

I can still remember my first ride on a two-wheeler.  It was a hot, sticky summer day in New York and my brother and I were out in the front yard, my brother tooling around on his Evel Knievel big wheel and me riding in circles on my prized possession-my very first bicycle, a pink number, with training wheels, a sparkly banana seat and rainbow-colored ribbons coming out of the handlebars. For weeks, I had pestered my mom to take the training wheels off of my bike and it was on this summer day she finally capitulated and carefully unscrewed those little wheels. When the deed was done, I took hold of my new and improved bike, swung my leg over the seat and got ready to start racing the big kids on the block up and down our stretch of jutted sidewalk.  Before I could put my feet on the pedals, my mom gently explained that this was like a new bike and I had to learn how to ride without training wheels.  She suggested we practice riding with her holding onto the back of the seat to help me.  I found this to be a ridiculous notion, and tried to tell her that I was big enough to do it by myself and didn’t need any help—that was for babies.  She ignored my protests and wordlessly took hold of the back of my seat and told me I could start pedaling. 

With the first stroke of the pedal, I felt something different than usual in my well-worn bicycle.  It felt wobbly and unsteady.  I wasn’t sure I liked this.  I was used to a smooth, unadulterated ride.  It was then that I started to feel afraid.  Without those two extra little wheels, my world was unbalanced and I would have to learn on my own how to stay upright.  I yelled to my mom that I wanted to stop, that I was going to fall, but my bike kept moving forward, and after a few seconds, the wobbling stopped and I was cruising along the sidewalk. The fear dissipated and all I could think about was how far I could go now.  I yelled back at my mom that she could let go now, but I could no longer hear her behind me, or smell her perfume.  When I realized she had already let go, there was a distinct moment of panic that was overcome by the newfound freedom that comes with navigating your own way.

And it was in that way that  cycling always seemed to mimic the contours and challenges of life from childhood to the transition to adolescence and finally adulthood, and somehow the milestones of my own life transitions are marked by memories of biking.

Long after I outgrew my wonderous banana seat bike, I began to covet my older cousin’s sleek, baby blue Schwinn 10-speed.  By then, we had moved out of the city and into the suburbs on Long Island, with wide, flat, tree-lined streets, nature preserves, a bike route to the beach and of course, shopping malls.  As a pre-teen (what we call “tweens” now), oh how I thought a 10-speed would change my life.  With it I could travel great distances far and wide on this island we lived on, no more begging rides from my mom or failing that, the dreaded slow pace of walking to get to where I needed to go.  And then one day, the unthinkable happened.  My cousin came over to our house, gliding into the driveway, already swinging one leg off the bike of my dreams before it had come to a stop. She gave the kickstand a whack, so I could get the full view of the bike standing tall in all its splendor.  She told me the bike was mine if I wanted it. Mind-blown, I couldn’t even stammer out a proper thank you before I climbed up on it and asked if I could take it for a spin.  She started to explain to me how the brakes were different than on my bike—they were on the handlebars! And that this bike had gears.  So much information, much of which was important, I would later learn, but I waved her off.  I know, I know.  I can do it myself.  And with that I pedaled out of the driveway and down the street.  I tried to remember how my cousin would hunch down low over the handlebars, gripping the curved bars, with fingers fluttering over the brakes, just in case.  I adjusted my position, into something that seemed like what I had seen, and gave the brakes a little tap to make sure they worked, and then pedaled flat-out. The speed at which I travelled seemed faster than a car and it was glorious.  This was the bike that I would ride with my friends down to the mall, to the beach, to school, to wherever we could go that was away from our parents to our own world. This was the bike that ushered me into my teenage years and allowed me the freedom to explore. I loved the simplicity of this freedom.  Just grab your bike and go out into the world—no plans, no responsibilities, no limits on what you could do.

Many years later, after I moved to San Francisco and became a lawyer, I was bike-less and living in a concrete world, with hills like mountains and traffic that was unrelenting.  It didn’t particularly seem like a hospitable place for riding but I saw bikes all over.  When I decided to buy a new bike, I was certain that I would ride only within the safety of car-free trails, too afraid of the traffic congestion, but once I got on my new bike, (and put on a helmet, of course) it was like being transported to childhood—a few minutes of riding released my worries and made me feel free from the heaviness of my day-to-day obligations.  I slowly started venturing out on short rides close to home, and then farther, plotting out my routes to take advantage of the growing number of bike lanes, and minimizing my interactions with the dreaded MUNI busses.  It was a different kind of riding, one that was less care-free, but  energizing, nonetheless.   It was then that I got involved with the local bike coalitions, and began representing cyclists injured by drivers.  The work felt important, as each case made small changes to the way the driving world viewed cyclists and the ways in which cities decided to prioritize traffic.  20 years after my first bike ride through San Francisco, the cycling infrastructure there is a pure amazement, connected bike routes, segregated bike lanes, and people ditching their cars for bike-only living. 

After moving to Paso Robles, I had to readjust my riding once again.  Riding through the rural areas of North County is serene, with horses, cows and farms replacing honking horns, truck exhausts, and angry bus drivers.  I still get surprised when a grape harvester passes me by or when I have to slow down for my neighbor riding her horse in front of me.  It reminds me of the peacefulness of my teenage riding days on Long Island.  In town, here and there, I see the glimmers of bike advocacy creating change in the form of bike lanes, and marked share lanes, but we have a long way to go before catching up to the work that has been done in San Luis Obispo, with the help of Bike SLO County.  I’m looking forward to someday being able to bike to my office in downtown Paso through a secure, connected network of bike lanes.

Beat the Heat with these Summer Safety Tips

summer cyclist safety tips in paso robles and san francisco personal injury lawyers

Summer is here and with the extra hours of sunshine comes the heat!  In San Francisco, a “hot” day might be in the 80s, but this year it’s already been hotter than usual and at our Paso Robles office and in other scenic riding locations on the Central Coast, temperatures can easily surpass 100 degrees.  If you plan to go out in the heat for cycling or other activities, read on for some of our favorite tips to combat the hot weather.

Hydrate

Hydration always sounds like an obvious first step in the heat, but it isn’t just about hydrating during your summer activities, you’ll want to hydrate before and after, too.  The CDC and Cal/OSHA recommend 1 cup of water for every 15 minutes of physical activity in the heat and consuming electrolytes (sports drinks/fruit juice) before and after to replenish the salt we use for sweating.  They also warn that alcohol can reduce the body’s ability to regulate temperatures and should be avoided before your planned cycling day or any other activity in the heat.  And just a reminder, CA Vehicle Code 21200.5 does not provide a specific blood-alcohol threshold to be considered riding a bicycle under the influence, but cycling impaired is unlawful and a violation fine can be up to $250.

Keep Your Core Cool

There are a variety of products out there to help keep your core temperature down in hot weather like specialty towels and jerseys.  For motorcyclists, there are suits and jackets with mesh ventilation flaps.  But there are also some very easy ways to keep your core cool without needing a gear upgrade.  A favorite of many cyclists is freezing your water bottle when half full to create an ice block.  A fun alternative from wine country is to freeze grapes and use them as ice cubes; they’ll cool your water and provide a tasty snack later.  Want more?  Here’s a DIY tutorial on how to make your own neck cooler here.

Watch for Signs of Heat Stroke

While you may have taken all of the steps to beat the heat, others with you may not have properly prepared.  Symptoms of over-heating include headache, nausea, dizziness, and weakness.  At the point of heat exhaustion, the affected person may sweat more profusely than usual and have a rapid pulse.  If heat exhaustion goes untreated, the person may stop sweating altogether and/or become confused; the warning signs of heat stroke, a serious medical condition.  If you believe someone is in danger of over-heating, get them into a cool area immediately.  If there are concerns of heat stroke, call 911.  For more information, visit the CDC’s website here.

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Add Rahman Law to Your Phone Contacts

No one ever expects to be involved in a collision.  If you plan to be out cycling, riding a motorcycle, or driving this summer, be sure to add us to your contacts in your phone.  That way, you can call us immediately if you ever need us.  We also have free toolkits and guidebooks on our website here.  Have a great summer!

Rahman Law PC

Bicycle Safety: How the Speed Limit Factors into Cyclist Fatalities

bicycle safety, cyclist fatalities

In previous blogs, we’ve talked about the demographics shown as most likely to be involved in a fatal bicycle accident and how speeding contributes to traffic collision deaths.  But while it might seem like common knowledge that the speed limit will also factor into cyclist fatalities (faster speeds usually means more powerful impact/injury), the specifics of how the speed limit relates to the outcome of a bicycle accident are not often discussed.  And the results may surprise you.

Rural and Urban Jungles for Cyclists

Before we talk about numbers, it’s important to know that there are differences between riding in urban and rural areas when talking about bicycle safety.  Urban areas see 60%-71% of bicyclist fatalities across the nation and California is still in the top three states for cyclist fatalities.  California’s ranking for cyclists fatalities might have something to do with having the largest population of any state and 87% of those nearly 40-million people living in urban areas (Stanford).  

Then speed limit where most bicycle fatalities occur in rural areas is 55 mph. 

This speed is the zone with the second most bicyclist fatalities overall; however, for urban riders, 55 mph is only the sixth-ranked speed zone for fatalities.  The approximately 29% of total rural cycling crashes with fatalities occurring in a 55 mph zone is significant.

The speed limit where most bicyclist fatalities occur in urban areas is 45 mph followed closely by 35 mph.

Because most bicyclist fatalities occur in urban areas, the data gathered shows urban cyclist collision fatalities can occur in most speed zones from 25 mph to 75 mph with the majority falling between 35 mph and 45 mph.  Interestingly, the same speed zones show the most urban pedestrian fatalities, too. 

bicycle safety, cyclist fatalities

Speed Limits Are Different Than Speeding

The information we just presented comes from speed limits, not speed travelled.  Reports vary on the percentage of bicyclist fatalities resulting directly from speeding because being the leading cause is different than being one of several causes and can be difficult to separate.  A 2010-2015 report found only 8.6% of bicyclist fatalities resulted directly from speeding (NHTSA, FARS, & ARF).  But don’t think speeding isn’t a problem – in San Francisco, speeding is the leading cause of traffic collision deaths (SFPD 2010-2014) and is a leading contributor to traffic collision fatalities nationwide. 

This report also found most fatalities for cyclists were occurring in non-intersections.  This makes sense when the speed limit with the most fatalities for riders in urban and rural locations combined is 45 mph followed by 55 mph; these speed zones will have fewer intersections and crosswalks than zones with lower speeds. 

bicycle safety, pedestrian injury, cyclist injury

Bicycle Safety Starts With Awareness

Knowing what factors can lead to or increase the chances of a cyclist fatality can help riders and drivers be more aware of their surroundings.  The bicycle accident attorneys at Rahman Law support Vision Zero for San Francisco and we look forward to the day when no cyclist or pedestrian will become a fatality statistic. 

Bicycle Safety: How the Speed Limit Factors into Cyclist and Pedestrian Injuries

Most cyclist fatalities in urban and rural areas occur in 45 mph zones (link to other blog on fatalities); however, the likelihood of sustaining a survivable injury as a pedestrian or cyclist in a 45 mph zone is not the same. 

What is the same is the speed limit where the most injuries occur: 25 mph.

Part of the reason most injuries occur for cyclists and pedestrians in 25 mph zones is the survivability factor.  The likelihood of sustaining a serious or fatal injury in a collision with a vehicle as a pedestrian or cyclist goes up dramatically from 18% at 20 mph to 77% at 40 mph (AAA Foundation).  Another reason for more cyclist and pedestrian injuries at lower speeds is the increased exposure as there are likely going to be more pedestrians in a 25 mph zone than a 75 mph zone.  

The speed limits where the most cyclist and pedestrian injuries occur according to the NHTSA are 25 mph, 35 mph, and 30 mph (in that order).  This data is combined for urban and rural areas.  Keep in mind that the data for injuries comes from serious injuries which are reported.  There may be more injuries occurring than what are reported and would likely be in lower speed zones because of the lack for the need of medical care.

bicycle safety, pedestrian injury, cyclist injury
bicycle safety, pedestrian injury, cyclist injury

Speeding is Also Responsible for Cyclist and Pedestrian Injuries

The information gathered by the NHTSA, NCSA, FARS, and ARF between 2010 and 2015 relied on speed limits to assume speed for much of their data.  Speeding (going over the speed limit) factors into approximately 30% of all motor vehicle fatalities in the United States and is the leading cause of about 8% of pedestrian fatalities.  The most common speed limit zone for pedestrian and cyclist fatalities to occur as a result of speeding is 35 mph.  Specifics on the number of cyclist and pedestrian injuries that were a direct result of speeding was not published; however, 35 mph is the zone with the second-most injuries for both pedestrians and bicyclists, making it likely that there are a portion of injuries occurring as a direct result of speeding.  The unfortunate reality is that speed kills.

Pedestrian Safety

The California Legislature enacted the Pedestrian Safety Act in 2000 which includes new requirements for driver education on pedestrian safety among other items.  California Vehicle Code sections 21950-21954 provide legal measures for pedestrian safety and protection, including that drivers have a higher duty of care than pedestrians.  And in San Francisco, pedestrian safety is going even further with Vision Zero to bring the number of pedestrian injuries and fatalities to zero.  These measures are looking to increase pedestrian safety through more awareness and enforcement in California, including speed-related pedestrian safety issues.

It’s About Time…

The stoplight at 12th Street and Market has become more of guideline than a rule for many cyclists because the timing of the light is just so inconvenient. The wait often prompts cyclists to cross early when they do not have the right of way. This preemptive crossing results in heavy fines when the cyclists are caught and is dangerous to pedestrians when they are not.

In order to tackle the problems at this intersection, Bert Hill, chairman of the city’s Bicycle Advisory Committee citizen oversight group, is recommending the implementation of a separate cyclist-crossing light. This light would speed up the timing for cyclists, cueing up a green light for cyclists when it is activated. The trade-off, argues local disability advocate Bob Planthold, is that disabled pedestrians will have less time to safely cross the street. His proposed solution is separate sensors for pedestrians and cyclists. Although this would be more expensive, it would better accommodate all interested parties.

Although no plan has been approved yet, committees are working on finding a solution that is acceptable to everyone.

If you ever need a bicycle accident attorney in San Francisco, Paso Robles, or the surrounding Central California Coast area, contact us for a free consultation.

Source:

http://www.sfexaminer.com/local/transportation/2012/12/speedier-signal-change-could-improve-troubled-san-francisco-intersectio

Canadian Study Provides Support for New Protected Bike Lane Bill

Last month Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 819, a bill intended to encourage more communities to implement modern protected bike facilities. The current system actively discourages cities from implementing protected bike lanes and other cycling innovations commonly used in Europe because they are not legally covered by Caltrans’s outdated bike lane standards. The new bill is a step forward since it streamlines a process by which cities and municipalities can apply to implement more innovative designs.

And now the bill is getting support from a Canadian study which compares the various different environments in which people ride their bikes. In many ways, their findings reflect common sense. For example, they found that streets with bike lanes are safer than streets without bike lanes. Not to sound rude but, duh. The suprising news is in the numbers. A bike lane (even the most basic and flawed as many in California are) will reduce the risk of injury to cyclists by 50% as compared to a similar street without a bike lane. And the same style street with a protected bike lane (meaning barriers between cars and cyclists) drop risk of injury 90%. Those statistics are astoudning. Numbers like these are hard to argue with.

Imagine, if cities invested in protected bike lanes, it is likely that injuries to cyclists would drop approximately 90%. That means more cyclists on the road and we have posted numerous articles about what more cyclists means for cities; safer streets, better public transportation, less traffic and congestion, more tourism, and the list goes on.

Basically, the Canadian study put numbers to something that San Francisco cyclists have known all along. You have to invest in safety. It may be a lot up front, but the returns are astronomical.

A Protected Bike Lane in San Francisco

If you ever need a bicycle accident attorney in San Francisco, Paso Robles, or the surrounding Central California Coast area, contact us for a free consultation.

Source:

http://calbike.org/californias-new-protected-bikeways-law-could-get-a-boost-from-new-research/#more-4316

http://calbike.org/advocacy/better-bikeways/

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/10/dedicated-bike-lanes-can-cut-cycling-injuries-half/3654/

Photo Source:

SF Gets First Protected Bike Lane! Drivers Already Violating It

Rules of the Road, Again….

The tragic death of Hailey Ratliff, the 12 year old Novato girl struck and killed while riding her bicycle in October, has local police pleading Bay Area residents to educate themselves on the rules of the road. Here are some basic precautions that EVERY cyclist needs to take:

  1. All cyclists, minors included, must learn and follow the rules of the road. For those riders without a driver’s license (and subsequently without the mandatory training) this means familiarizing yourself with California and local laws.
  2. It may seem counterintuitive, but it is safer to bike on the street than on the sidewalk. Streets are generally flatter, the visibility is better and there is less risk of a collision with cars exiting their driveways.
  3. Stay at least 3 feet from parked cars. The distance will allow for more reaction time if a car begins to pull onto the street.
  4. Wear a helmet.
  5. Use bike lights and reflectors, especially at night and during the winter when cloud cover can lower visibility.
  6. Always signal your moves and make your intentions obvious. If you are going to turn, make sure all the cars around you know you are going to turn.
  7. Drunk cycling is drunk driving.

It’s not fair, but it is true that it lands on cyclists to take extra precautions when sharing the road with cars. Winter in San Francisco and the Bay Area means heavy fog and wet roads. Please be safe!

If you ever need a bicycle accident attorney in San Francisco, Paso Robles, or the surrounding Central California Coast area, contact us for a free consultation.

Source:

http://www.californiabeat.org/2012/11/13/after-fatal-biking-accident-tips-for-a-safer-ride-in-the-bay-area

Historical Potholes

Half-hidden tracks belonging to the historic San Francisco Belt Railroad create a dangerous obstacle for cyclists along the waterway near Ghiradelli Square . The line, built in 1889, was used to transport cargo from the piers to various locations along the waterfront. In addition, since the line ran from  a tunnel under Fort Mason to the Presidio it was perfect for transporting troops during World War II. Since the line was officially shut down in 1993 this rich history has been at odds with the safety and ease of the roadway. The San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, which has jurisdiction over the tracks, says that the problem is that the tracks can’t merely be pulled up.

The Maritime National Park is looking for a compromise solution. Their original solution was to fill in the tracks in areas where people cycle most often and leave them alone in other places. However, the pavement cracks every time the sand under the tracks  shifts.

Park officials will hold an open house to gather public comment on possible solutions for the old tracks on Dec. 6, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Maritime Museum at 900 Beach St.

If you ever need a bicycle accident attorney in San Francisco, Paso Robles, or the surrounding Central California Coast area, contact us for a free consultation.

Sources:

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Hidden-danger-lurks-under-pavement-4018405.php

Octavia’s Woes

Even the most well-intentioned acts can have negative consequences.  Case in point, Octavia Boulevard in Hayes Valley. Prior to 2005 Hayes Valley was, in the words of Bay Citizen reporter Zusha Elinson, “a hooker haven beneath the Central Freeway”.  This all changed when the city replaced the overpass with Octavia Boulevard. With trees and a park the area became positively residential. Except that its not. It is a busy on-ramp for the near by freeway.

This combination, a residential spin on a congested, fast-moving, freeway onramp, has turned out to be dangerous. The intersection has the (dis)honor of being San Francisco’s most dangerous with 30 injury collisions in the last three years. In the last year alone the intersection was the site of 13 collisions involving injuries.

The real kicker is that 9 of those 13 crashes involved cyclists. With approximately 63,000 vehicles using the intersection each day, the danger to pedestrians and cyclists can be very real. Cars idle in the cross-walks, make illegal turns, get frustrated with the congestion and drive recklessly or simply treat it like the freeway it used to be. Rahman Law PC has successfully handled cases in which bicyclists haven been injured by vehicles on Octavia Boulevard. The majority of such injuries occur when drivers make an illegal right turn onto Market from Octavia.

A study by the SF County Transportation Authority recommends “improving bikeways and crosswalks and reducing car traffic by updating public transit and using congestion pricing, a system of electronic tolls for crowded streets.” It has also been suggested that the city install a camera to catch those vehicles that make an illegal right turn on Market. Whatever the solutions turn out to be, most people would agree that Octavia boulevard is an improvement to the overpass. Few would argue that it has not improved and rejuvenated the area. However, the city now needs to protect its cyclists and pedestrians and take measures to make Octavia safer.

If you ever need a bicycle accident attorney in San Francisco, Paso Robles, or the surrounding Central California Coast area, contact us for a free consultation.

Source:

http://www.baycitizen.org/transportation/story/good-intentions-lead-highest-sf-crash/